Balls, Swedish.

I’m off for another round of confusion at IKEA this morning, wish me luck!  I was up until the wee hours of the morn working on my cabinet configuration and then the boy decided to run screaming into our bedroom at 5, claiming he was being chased by seven- headed monsters.  In other words, my brain is mush, enjoy these links:

The awesometastic Amanda Hocking interviewed me for her blog.  Check out the interview, where I divulge  embarrassing information like what instruments I played in band.  One of them rhymes with Globe Ho.  Uh, kinda.

If you all liked the cover of Glimpse, you’ll really like my sister’s portrait work.  Her Mark Twain is the coolest.  Mark Twain means a lot to me because I’m from Missouri and also because there was this super rad dude when I was growing up that used to dress up like Mark Twain and hang out at the grocery store by my house.  So, he reminds me of rivers and groceries, two of my favorite things.

On her blog this morning, Zoe Winters asks: When Stephenie Meyer isn’t rolling around in her big piles of money, does she care that some people don’t think she’s a good writer?  Okay, the post is about way more than that- how much attention should writer’s pay to public opinion of themselves versus their writing?

Enjoy the links, there should be enough excitement there to get you through a coffee break or two.

7 thoughts

  1. I did! I have changed it about five times since I started, but I finally found one that I like. I think the multiple color options and the big print are what hooked me. 🙂 Now I have to go fix a typo. Meyer, not Meyers. I always do that.

  2. hehehe Everybody wants to say Meyers.

    I think my big beef over the Twilight haters is that Meyers probably just set out to entertain some people and make some money. She didn’t know she was going to become a phenomenon and she wasn’t trying to write the Great American Novel. So it’s a little unfair to get all crazy on her and act like she’s dumbing down the populace. Not her fault people went rabid for it.

  3. Exactly. I was talking to another writer the other day and someone had totally slammed her books (which I think are great, fun novels, so whatever)and complained about how they were silly and angsty. Well, they’re YA novels about magical creatures, let’s not get carried away and feel the need to bust out all of our critical thinking skills just because we were English majors who now work retail. I also said the thing about the Great American Novel. Personally, GAN’s hurt my head and I would rather read and write about fluffier things. If I want to pontificate and feel smart, I’ll talk about the oil spill or Haiti or something.

  4. LMAO! I feel another blog post coming on! Totally agree on GAN. And it’s a hazard for writers that they seem to all want to write the GAN. And I wonder if wanting to be “deep” isn’t it’s own breed of writer vanity.

  5. Thinking I had to be “deep” and want to try my hardest to write the GAN is what kept me from writing any novels at all for a long time. I am not a serious person, so I don’t know why I thought I would even be capable of writing a serious book. When I read the Outlander series it finally dawned on me, Oh, here’s a really smart lady who wrote entertaining books about all kinds of crazy fantastical things and rocked it and is wildly popular and that is enough-that would be enough for me. Hot Scottish are not gonna bring about world peace and I think we’re fine with it. 🙂

  6. hehe exactly! I got the most awesome Amazon review from a woman whose husband works overseas and she’s stressed from raising her kids and etc. And she was happy because my work was fun and escapism for her. And THAT is why I do it. Not to write some hoity toity GAN.

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